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Caleb Joseph Powell Unfound Podcast Episodes

Caleb Joseph Powell: A St. Patrick’s Day Disappearance| Ep 223

Caleb Joseph Powell was a 24 year old from Surprise, AZ. He had two siblings and loved the outdoors. On March 17, 2014, Caleb left his house with a co-worker—the plan was to take the man home. The drop off happened but Caleb never returned. He was never seen again.

Caleb Joseph Powell was a 24 year old from Surprise, AZ. He had two siblings and loved the outdoors. On March 17, 2014, Caleb left his house with a co-worker—the plan was to take the man home. The drop off happened but Caleb never returned. He was never seen again.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Help-Find-Missing-Caleb-Powell-349904071832453

Charley Project: http://charleyproject.org/case/caleb-joseph-powell

NAMUS: https://www.namus.gov/MissingPersons/Case#/30741?nav YouTube: https://youtu.be/Lx8CYuYleDk

If you have any information regarding the disappearance of Caleb Powell, please contact the Phoenix Police Department at (602) 262-6151.

Excerpt from Private Patreon Blog

I think in these situations where people are brutally honest, I think you have to remember how much pain these people have. How much their lives have been ruined. How their other relationships have suffered because of the disappearance that occurred. You’ve heard some of the parents even talk about neglecting their other children because a son or daughter went missing.

What I’m saying is I think that kind of trauma can distort how they think people perceive them. This causes them to say things that are outrageous to us. But to them, the statement is perfectly sane. Remember: THEY are the ones who are suffering, not us. Thus, some consideration must always be given to understand that these people no longer see the world like we do.

“But Ed, aren’t there some family members you’ve talked to who you said weren’t ready to go on Unfound?”

I have said that. That is certainly true. What makes these people different from the ones who eventually appear?

It’s mostly a feel thing. All of these family members are damaged. They feel cheated. They feel wronged. They feel like other people have gotten better lives than they have, and they know that may ever change. They harbor a lot of guilt and envy.

But there is a point—and I can’t probably explain it by writing—but I always want to make sure I am not exploiting people. Meaning, am I having them on the program BECAUSE they are so damaged? That is a question I continue to ask myself with every new person I talk to. Does this person sound mentally and emotionally capable of being questioned in-depth for 2 hours about the most difficult time in his or her life?

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